Firefighters traded their overalls for lyrca before setting out on a bike-ride to raise money for burns victims.

They arrived in Brisbane today, after leaving Bundaberg last Tuesday.

Rachel Tinney reports.

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TRANSCRIPT

It was handshakes all round when the 31 firefighters stepped off their bikes for the final time at the Royal Children’s Hospital.

The 815 kilometre trek saw them ride through country towns, including Clifton and Dalby, raising money and spirits.

Duncan Armstrong, Olympic Swimmer: “It’s full of comradery, full of good humour. The support staff just keep it all bubbling along nicely and it really has an effect on the communities we move through with all the donations as they come in.”

But making the journey in only eight days, called for some long mileage each day.

Duncan Armstrong, Olympic Swimmer: “And then you start pedalling, and you don’t stop basically until the job’s done. One day was 160km – so that’s a long time in the saddle, six or seven hours.”

The fourth annual Bike for Burns raised much needed funds for the hospital’s Burns Unit.

Meredtih Campbell, Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation: “This year, this group has done an incredible job. They’ve raised almost $42 – $43,000 which is a record for them. Over the last three years, they’ve raised $90,000 so they’ve really taken it to a whole new level.”

The money raised will fund research into current burns treatments and will help doctors discover just what it is in running water that reduces the effects of burns.

Prof Roy Kimble, Director Burns and Trauma Unit: “Why does it decrease the depth of the burn? Once we’ve worked that out, we’ll be able to come up with possibly another substance instead of water we can use which will have an even better effect.”

The hospital is also working on other treatments, including creating skin grafts for children.

The firefighters can now take a well deserved break, before going back to their job saving other lives.

Rachel Tinney, QUT News