QUT News

Welcome to QUT News - the home of journalism produced by journalism students from the Queensland University of Technology.

QUT is a university for the real world. We provide opportunities for our students to work with industry experts and the latest technology to produce a professional news service during semester. Our graduating students have gone on to become journalists in all media and winners of prestigious Walkley Awards for excellence in journalism. In all, QUT is a great place to start your career in journalism.

For news from QUT covering university research, achievements of staff and students and corporate events go to qut.edu.au/about/news.

CRICOS No. 00213J

Admin

Exploring the South Pacific

Main image: CHRIStophe Robert HERVOUËT (Flickr)

Main image: CHRIStophe Robert HERVOUËT (Flickr)

Six QUT journalism students embarked on a 17 day trip through New Caledonia, Vanuatu and New Zealand this June to discover more about the South Pacific.

They encountered a rich diversity of Pacific cultures as well as some familiar Aussie accents from people who have made the region’s islands their home.

But there may be changes taking place in paradise too with a referendum looming for one Pacific nation.

Read on » Exploring the South Pacific

An Aussie taking the Pacific coffee industry by storm

By Harriet Harvey

Tanna Coffee Shop is a popular tourist destination. Picture by: Jane Mahoney

Tanna Coffee Shop is a popular tourist destination. Picture by: Jane Mahoney

Coffee has been grown on Tanna Island, Vanuatu, since 1860 and although coffee is not particularly popular among local people in Vanuatu, Tanna Coffee is taking the market by storm.

Read on » An Aussie taking the Pacific coffee industry by storm

Profile: Pacific journalist interested in social justice

By Jane Mahoney

Ben Bohane’s career wrap sheet is a resumé with nary a dull moment – a career memory spanning more than 20 years across many parts of a troubled globe.

Image of Ben Bohane

Ben Bohane, journalist

The renowned photojournalist, who now lives in Vanuatu, continues travelling, reporting and above all documenting his exploits with galleries of arresting pictures.

Returning to Port Vila this month after his latest journey abroad, Mr Bohane spoke with visiting journalists about his passion for the Pacific and his career in news media.

Mr Bohane began his journalism career in the late 1980’s with a cadetship at Stiletto, a Melbourne based alternative lifestyle magazine that he describes as a “punk-street-rag.”

Read on » Profile: Pacific journalist interested in social justice

Melanesian Spearhead Group wants action on New Caledonia, de-nuclearisation and climate change

By Harriet Harvey

FLNKS representative, Jimmy Naouma and MSG Corporate Development Officer, Rose Wete. Picture by: Jane Mahoney

FLNKS representative, Jimmy Naouma and MSG Corporate Development Officer, Rose Wete. Picture by: Jane Mahoney

The Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG) wants joint action within the Pacific region, on three key issues: independence for New Caledonia, reviving the de-nuclearisation debate, and pressing for international action on climate change.

Read on » Melanesian Spearhead Group wants action on New Caledonia, de-nuclearisation and climate change

Kava: A tradition, a business, and a problem

By Danielle Veivers

Traditionally, Kava, the aniseed-tasting drink that some people say looks like thin muddy water,  was used for ceremonial purposes in Vanuatu, but changing times have given it a new role.

It’s a sedative drink made from the root of the Kava plant and water, generally used for de-stressing, anxiety, sickness, weight loss – and because it is significantly cheaper than alcohol.

Read on » Kava: A tradition, a business, and a problem

Celebrating Culture: Vanuatu Cultural Centre creating pride in the community

By Harriet Harvey

The much loved Vanuatu Cultural Centre. Picture by: Jane Mahoney

The much loved Vanuatu Cultural Centre. Picture by: Jane Mahoney

Edgar Hinge works at the national cultural centre as a tour guide and he believes it is a great step in protecting and teaching Vanuatu’s history.

“There was a very big demand to build a cultural centre and National Museum in Vanuatu to promote and revive it well,” says Mr Hinge.

Read on » Celebrating Culture: Vanuatu Cultural Centre creating pride in the community

The future of news in Vanuatu

By Danielle Veivers

Vanuatu VillageIncreasing internet and social media use is forcing newspapers in Vanuatu to consider the future of communication.

The tradition of “coconut radio” in the villages, the mysterious and rapid transmission of news by word-of-mouth-and-thought, is taking up new electronic forms.

Vanuatu has 260 000 people, the Ni-Vanuatu, of whom 70% live in remote village communities on the 83 islands – with only five of those islands regularly receiving a delivery of hard copy newspapers.

Read on » The future of news in Vanuatu

Vanuatu’s optimism about media and freedom in fourth decade of independence

By Jaleesa Simpson and Emma Clarke

Media workers in Vanuatu say they are upsetting the usual story of a small developing country, by getting more freedom of information, not less – though it has never been easy.

With over 80 islands comprising that Pacific state, independent since 1980, the media industry is needing to work on creative and cost effective ways to broaden their reach to as much of the population as possible.

Read on » Vanuatu’s optimism about media and freedom in fourth decade of independence

Good cops’ challenge: Keeping the peace in Port Vila

By Emma Clarke

Central Police Station, Port Vila

Central Police Station, Port Vila

Hidden behind the cruise liner docks, the paper flower leis and abundance of bars, Vanuatu’s Port Vila has a shadow under its sun.

Outside on the streets, masses of mostly-Australian tourists mingle with locals in a potentially potent combination as a rapidly increasing crime rate has resources stretched to their limits and police severely concerned.

Read on » Good cops’ challenge: Keeping the peace in Port Vila

Cruising to paradise: big ships to transform the Pacific holiday business

By Danielle Veivers

Danielle Veivers talks about the cruise industry in the South Pacific.

Danielle Veivers, QUT News

The great boom around the world in ocean cruises has definitely not left out the South Pacific, where cruising has been part of the travel scene for several decades.

In New Caledonia, industry leaders are focused on ensuring they get a fair share of the benefits from the huge growth in cruises.

The world wide market has jumped up from three million people going to sea in luxury in 1990, to 21.5 million this year, now still expanding at seven per cent a year, according to figures from a leading analyst Cruise Market Watch.

Read on » Cruising to paradise: big ships to transform the Pacific holiday business